How to: Remove diacritics (accents) in C# strings

cs

Quick note: How to remove diacritics (accents) from a C# string?
Use this extension method ;)

public static string RemoveDiacritics(this string input)
{
    var stFormD = input.Normalize(NormalizationForm.FormD);
    var len = stFormD.Length;
    var sb = new StringBuilder();
    for (int i = 0; i < len; i++)
    {
        var uc = System.Globalization.CharUnicodeInfo.GetUnicodeCategory(stFormD[i]);
        if (uc != System.Globalization.UnicodeCategory.NonSpacingMark)
        {
            sb.Append(stFormD[i]);
        }
    }
    return (sb.ToString().Normalize(NormalizationForm.FormC));
}

How to: Server Side Filter database (Entity Framework + DevExpress Filter control)

Imagine you have a table with millions of rows. It’s not a good idea showing all these data in a grid or similar, and it doesn’t matter you’re developing a web or desktop application… It’s not a good idea at all.

In these cases we should use conditional filters applied in the data source (usually a database) to get part of the information and return only the rows that match with the specified criteria. Using this technique the amount of network traffic could be reduced to a hundreds of rows or less, depending on the criteria.

There are different ways of accomplish that, but today I’d like to focus on apply this technique using a control from the DevExpress suite: The Filter Editor control.

DXFilterControl

 

As you can see the control looks nice, and it’s quite simple to use: You just need to link this control to another (usually a Grid or Tree), and automatically will retrieve the columns and values information from the source control. Then you’ll be able to filter the linked control and get a filter string which you can reuse later in other controls of the suite.

However the previous filter has the disadvantage that is a client filter, and is applied after we retrieve all the rows from the data source, not before. Our goal have to be apply the filter before getting the information.

Today I’ve been playing a little bit with this control, using a SQL Server database that contains a products table with 3.7 million rows and Entity Framework 6.0 as an ORM.

Note: For this test I’d like to use a SQL Tabled-Valued Function to access the data instead of using the default DbSet, because it’s supposed that I’ve to do some hard calculations inside the function. But you can also use the EF DbSet directly, as usual.

EFModel

Now our goal here is:

  1. Create at runtime a filter over the Products table using the filter control.
  2. Parse that filter string and adapt it to the EF syntax.
  3. Append the filter to the mapped function (thx to IQueryable!) before execution.
  4. Finally, execute the filtered query against the data source

First we need to add an EF designer (we won’t use Code First because we’re going to map a Tabled valued function with is not supported). And add the table Products and the GetAllProducts function.

In our form, we just need to add a couple of Devexpress controls: A GridControl and a FilterControl, linked using the FilterControl SourceControl property (this allows the filter control to retrieve the names and data types of the grid columns).

DynamicFiltersEF

Then we’ll add three buttons. The first one will retrieve the first 25.000 rows from the database (previously I’ve tried to get all rows from table, but the app crashed with an OutOfMemory exception ;))

The second button (this is the interesting one) will execute the current filter from the FilterControl.

Let’s code:

The first button is really simple. It’s just a query over the GetAllProducts function adding a where clause which will be resolved later (because EF is based on IQueryable<T>) when calling ToListAsync method.

private async void simpleButton1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    using (var context = new TestBigDbEntities())
    {
        var filteredproducts = context.GetAllProducts().Where(p => p.ProductId <= 25000);
        await ExecuteQueryAsync(filteredproducts);
    }
}

private async Task ExecuteQueryAsync(IQueryable filteredProducts)
{
    clock.Restart();
    productBindingSource.DataSource = await filteredProducts.ToListAsync();
    clock.Stop();
    Text = clock.ElapsedMilliseconds.ToString("n2");
}

For the second button we need something more. Something that allows us to translate the filter into a valid where clause, and append it to the function.  The good news are that this functionality is provided natively by Devexpress:

private async void simpleButton2_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    var converter = new DevExpress.Data.Linq.CriteriaToEFExpressionConverter();
    using (var context = new TestBigDbEntities())
    {
        var filteredproducts =
                DevExpress.Data.Linq.Helpers.CriteriaToQueryableExtender.AppendWhere(
                context.GetAllProducts(),
                converter,
                filterControl1.FilterCriteria);
        await ExecuteQueryAsync(filteredproducts);
    }
}

All we’ve to do is that:

Clean and simple. The first one creates a converter for translating the filter into EF syntax, while the second one appends the filter to the EF function using the previous converter.
And finally, here’s the SQL in the profiler. Exactly what I’ve expected.

SQLProfiler

So well… if you’re using Devexpress in your current project there’re no excuses for not including dynamic filters that user can save and reuse at runtime, uh? :P

Happy coding!

Bonus

The third button code shows how to get the TSQL syntax from the Filter control, that you can use it to query the database directly ;)

private void simpleButton3_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    var tsql = DevExpress.Data.Filtering.CriteriaToWhereClauseHelper.
        GetMsSqlWhere(filterControl1.FilterCriteria);
    MessageBox.Show(tsql);
}

BonusTSQLFilter

Extract extra large Icon from a file, including network paths!

Edit (04/16/2014): Added a new function called GetBitmapFromFolderPath, which returns the associated icon from the path to a Folder (or drive!).

image

Sometimes we are required to show a list of files with their associated icons. This task sounds quite easy, and in fact it is… Except if you have to deal with files in network paths or you want to get different icons sizes, apart the typical 32×32.

If you want to achieve this using managed code (the easy way), there is a static method called ExtractAssociatedIcon under the class Icon to achieve that, but sadly this method doesn’t work with UNC paths neither return other sizes that 32×32 pixels.

In my current project I needed to show four different icons sizes (including the extra-large icon, also called “jumbo”), so I’ve decided to use some functions and structures from the Win32 API. Of course, if anyone knows a better way to do it, please contact with me ASAP :)

First, let’s see the final code:


private static IntPtr GetIconHandleFromFilePath(
    string filepath, IconSizeEnum iconsize)
{
    var shinfo = new Shell.SHFILEINFO();
    const uint SHGFI_SYSICONINDEX = 0x4000;
    const int FILE_ATTRIBUTE_NORMAL = 0x80;
    const int ILD_TRANSPARENT = 1;
    uint flags = SHGFI_SYSICONINDEX;
    var retval = SHGetFileInfo(filepath, FILE_ATTRIBUTE_NORMAL,
        ref shinfo, Marshal.SizeOf(shinfo), flags);
    if (retval == 0) throw (new System.IO.FileNotFoundException());
    var iconIndex = shinfo.iIcon;
    var iImageListGuid = newGuid("46EB5926-582E-4017-9FDF-E8998DAA0950");
    Shell.IImageList iml;
    var hres = SHGetImageList((int)iconsize, ref iImageListGuid, out iml);
    var hIcon = IntPtr.Zero;
    hres = iml.GetIcon(iconIndex, ILD_TRANSPARENT, ref hIcon);
    return hIcon;
}

In this code we’re using several API calls. Here’s the tricky part:

First, we need to make call to the SHGetFileInfo function that receives a reference to a structure of type SHFILEINFO, which contains the index of the icon image within the system image list. We will use this index later.

Then we’ve to make is a second call to the SHGetImageList function that receives an output parameter with an IImageList structure, which is modified within the function.

This struct retrieve a COM interface and we need to keep in mind a couple of things:

a) We must use the GUID of this interface in the declaration:

[ComImportAttribute()]
[GuidAttribute(“46EB5926-582E-4017-9FDF-E8998DAA0950”)]
[InterfaceTypeAttribute(ComInterfaceType.InterfaceIsIUnknown)]

b) And in the improbable case you are going to deploy your project over XP, remember that SHGetImageList is not exported correctly in XP. For this reason you must hardcode the function’s entry point. Apparently (and hopefully) ordinal 727 isn’t going to change…

Once we have that COM interface, we only need to call its GetIcon method, passing a parameter with the desired size, and obtaining a handle to the icon by reference.

After having the handle its really simple create an Icon from the handle, and then convert to a Bitmap, BitmapSource or other:


public static System.Drawing.Bitmap GetBitmapFromFilePath(
 string filepath, IconSizeEnum iconsize)
{
    IntPtr hIcon = GetIconHandleFromFilePath(filepath, iconsize);
    var myIcon = System.Drawing.Icon.FromHandle(hIcon);
    var bitmap = myIcon.ToBitmap();
    myIcon.Dispose();
    DestroyIcon(hIcon);
    SendMessage(hIcon, WM_CLOSE, IntPtr.Zero, IntPtr.Zero);
    return bitmap;
}

Tip: It’s very important don’t forget to destroy the resources (Icon) when working with the Win32 API!

This method calls the previous one, obtains the icon’s handle and then creates the icon using the handle. Then creates a bitmap from the icon, destroys the icon and returns the bitmap.

I’ve also created an enumeration with the different flags values:

private const int SHGFI_SMALLICON = 0x1;
private const int SHGFI_LARGEICON = 0x0;
private const int SHIL_JUMBO = 0x4;
private const int SHIL_EXTRALARGE = 0x2;
private const int WM_CLOSE = 0x0010;

public enum IconSizeEnum
{
 SmallIcon16 = SHGFI_SMALLICON,
 MediumIcon32 = SHGFI_LARGEICON,
 LargeIcon48 = SHIL_EXTRALARGE,
 ExtraLargeIcon = SHIL_JUMBO
}

Finally, retrieving the icon from a file (inclusive if it’s in a network location) and specify the desired size it’s as easy as:

var size = ShellEx.IconSizeEnum.ExtraLargeIcon;
var ofd = new OpenFileDialog();
if (ofd.ShowDialog() == System.Windows.Forms.DialogResult.OK)
{
    labelFilePath.Text = ofd.FileName;
    pictureBox1.Image = ShellEx.GetBitmapFromFilePath(ofd.FileName, size);

}

image

Hope this helps! ;)

Download the source code.